By default, LaTex tables are very tight: \usepackage{booktabs} \begin{table}[] \centering \caption{My caption} \label{my-label} \begin{tabular}{@{}lll@{}} \toprule Rows & Column 1 & Column 2 \\ \midrule Row 1 & 1234 & 2345 \\ Row 2 & 3456 & 4567 \\ Row 3 & 5678 & 6789 \\ Row 4 & 7890 & 8901 \\ Row 5 & 9012 & 10000 \\ \bottomrule \end{tabular} \end{table} Adding this to the document preamble will add space between the rows:

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My minimal example: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} %%% FIGURES AND TABLES %%%% \usepackage{graphicx} %gives the \includegraphics[width=0.5\textwidth]{my_image} %%% PAGE AND TEXT SET-UP %%%% \usepackage{fullpage} %gets rids of the wide default borders \renewcommand{\baselinestretch}{1.5} %space between lines \begin{document} Hello hello hello \end{document} And then one that is not so minimal, but still pretty basic and useful: \documentclass[a4paper]{article} %%% FIGURES AND TABLES %%%% \usepackage{graphicx} %gives the \includegraphics[width=0.5\textwidth]{my_image} \usepackage{booktabs} %for nicer tables \usepackage{tabu} %advanced control over tables \renewcommand{\thetable}{S\arabic{table}} %if this is supplement (this numbers figures as S1, S2.

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One picture says more than a thousand words. You have what is one the left, and you want what is on the right. my_matrix = matrix(c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9), nrow=3) #matrix is a 2D array, this next row creates a third dimension, #duplicating the data my_array = array(my_matrix, dim = c(3,3,2)) There are a few different ways to do this, but by far the cleanest and quickest way is to just select the rows and columns multiple times, by replicating row and column numbers (instead of actually replicating each element):

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Install Pandoc: http://pandoc.org/ library(knitr) knit('report.Rmd') #This creates 'report.md' Open the Terminal, Command Prompt (search for cmd) or Windows Powershell, go to the folder and do: pandoc -s report.md -o report.tex And that’s it! (Read this, if you want vector images.)

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Author's picture

Riinu Ots

if it aint broke, you’re outdated

Data Science

Edinburgh, UK